Wo Shi Laowai – Wo Pa Shui

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Archive for the ‘Wang Xiansheng’ Category

Bang Out Of Order

Posted by MyLaowai on Monday, February 27, 2012

News Headlines for China last week:

Following the recent riots in Guangdong, it’s important to remind ourselves that not all Chinese people are stereotypical thieves and arsonists. The vast majority are drug dealers and rapists.

Wang Xiansheng now has to travel 5 miles every day for fresh water, 7 miles every day for food and 10 miles every day for medicine for he and his family. This is because the daft bastard and all his mates torched the local convenience store, KFC and Medical Centre and now he has to walk to Dongguan for his breakfast.

Riots in Henan last month caused over £1 million worth of improvements.

The MyLaowai Foundation just fostered a Chinese kid.
All three cans hit him right on the back of the head.

They’ve had to change the script for the pantomime ‘Jack & the Beanstalk’ in Hefei, Bejing, Chengdu, Shanghai, Changsha, and Shenzhen. Apparently, the giant couldn’t smell any Englishmen, only Chinese peasants.

Finally, it has been announced that the police are going to be allowed to use water cannons on rioters. They are putting some Persil in to stop the yellows running.

Posted in Newsflash, Wang Xiansheng, You're Joking? | 1 Comment »

Breaking News

Posted by MyLaowai on Sunday, December 25, 2011

Agencies, Hainan Island

Reports are coming in that Santa, together with all his reindeer, has been involved in a mid-air collision with Chinese fighter aircraft over international waters, and forced to land on Hainan Island.

The slow, reindeer-driven sleigh was forced to land on Hainan after being damaged when it was intercepted by two Chinese F-8 jets in international air space over the South China Sea.

One of the F-8s (roughly equivalent to a MIG-21) collided with the slow fat man and his sleigh, severely damaging four reindeer, before crashing with the apparent loss of the pilot. The Chinese claim that the damage was done when the sleigh veered towards the jet and damaged it.

This story seems implausible given that the F-8s were doing the intercepting, and are in any case much faster aircraft.

As the US Commander-in-Chief Pacific (CINCPAC), Admiral Robert F. Willard, was quick to point out, the onus lies on faster aircraft to stay out of the way of a slower one when an interception is taking place.

But what actually happened in the aerial incident remains a mystery since China continues to hold Santa and the reindeer incommunicado on Hainan. Finnish military attaches flew to Hainan today from the embassy in Beijing but have so far been denied access to the much-loved fat man and his faithful team.

Significantly, this is not an isolated incident, but the logical culmination of a trend, as Chinese jets have adopted ever more aggressive tactics when intercepting internationally-recognised anthropomorphic personifications such as the Tooth Fairy and the Gingerbread Man in international airspace off the Chinese coast. The Americans have complained about but not publicised these incidents.

“The intercepts by Chinese fighters over the last couple of months have become more aggressive, to the point that we felt that they were endangering the safety of our dearest fictitious creations,” Admiral Willard said in Hawaii.

Chinese Air Force Uber-General-Marshall Red-Banner Lucky-Colonel, Wang Xiangsheng, said in a statement today that “Chinese insist that all the air space above the South China Sea belong to China, in line with it’s repeated insistence that the whole of the South China Sea is Chinese territorial waters. Also we keep all presents we find in sleigh. All children now rejoice that Western Capitalist Plot is foiled!”

Posted in Newsflash, Wang Xiansheng | 4 Comments »

Zombie Survival

Posted by MyLaowai on Monday, August 29, 2011

Posted in Motivational!, Wang Xiansheng | 6 Comments »

Your Donations – Hard at Work

Posted by MyLaowai on Monday, August 8, 2011

Well folks, it isn’t often that I am genuinely emotional, but you’ve managed to move me to tears, you really have. The MyLaowai Charity Appeal is proving to be a wonderful success, with thousands of names rolling in from across the globe. From your Adam’s and Abigail’s, through the Noel’s and Oscar’s, and all the way to Zachary – you have done more for poor China in a week than China has managed in five thousand years alone!

Already, these names are being sorted, assigned, and despatched around the country, going to the needy and the nameless. Even as we speak, Liu’s and Chen’s are for the first time able to tell each other apart, and Zhang’s and Li’s can finally have some pride in themselves. We have heard stories – and seen for ourselves – Huang’s who never thought they could have a name of their own, suddenly enriched beyond their wildest dreams. And all this is due to you, who picked up the White Man’s Burden and gave generously to a cause not your own. I salute you all.

We decided it would be nice to follow one of the many names sent in, and see where it went. We picked one at random – it was ‘Alfonse Lickertwat‘. It turned out that this name was allocated to a poor, rural village somewhere in darkest Zhejiang, called Wenzhou (meaning “Shite Hills”, apparently). When we arrived, the entire town had turned out to welcome the arrival of The Name. The person destined to receive it, a twelve year old boy known only as Xiao Wang, was proudly front-and-centre with his parents, Wang Xiansheng and Wang Xiaojie. Here is little Wang, seen posing with his friends:


(From the left) Wang, Wang, Wang, Wang and Wang

Wang’s father, Wang, had this to say to our reporter: “Thank you very much. Now my son can earn a good living and care for us in the proper manner“. Wang’s mother, Wang, was nearly overcome, but unfortunately was able to say a few words anyway: “Oh, how wonderful! Now we will be the envy of all our neighbours whose children don’t have any real names! Thank you, thank, oh thanks you so much!”

Xiao Wang himself seemed a bit confused by all the attention, but the little tyke appeared to take it all in his stride. It wasn’t long before he was strutting through the streets, trying out his new name and generally showing off to all the other children. We have since heard that he has now been offered a place in the nearby school, No.47 Fireworks & Light Industrial Manufacturing Middle School and Happy Ending Massage Emporium.

So to you, my dear readers, I offer my thanks. It is your generosity that made this story, and many others like it, possible. Thank you.

Posted in Charity, Wang Xiansheng | 16 Comments »

How China Is This?

Posted by MyLaowai on Thursday, January 6, 2011

From the Party mouthpiece, ChinaDaily:

Mistresses jump into the river for BMW

Two 25-year-old women who shared the affections of the same man in Jinan, Shandong province, jumped into the Yellow River in the hope of snagging a BMW.

The pair were both mistresses of a man surnamed Wang, who had separately promised to buy each of them a BMW car.

When the two women ran into each other on Jan 3, they began to quarrel about the car. One of them said she would do anything for Wang and jumped into the Yellow River to show she meant it. Not to be outdone, the second one followed suit.

A passer-by surnamed Mi saw the two women, one of whom had cut her leg on an icicle, and pulled them from the river before calling their lover.

Wang, a construction supplier from the Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region, arrived at the scene with his wife, who denounced the two women and told her husband to return the BMW to her.

An anonymous party reported the ensuing row to the police, who recorded the incident, and Wang paid Mi for rescuing the women from the river.

You couldn’t make this stuff up, honestly.

Posted in ChinaDaily, Wang Xiansheng | 28 Comments »

A Song For The Times

Posted by MyLaowai on Wednesday, April 1, 2009

Oh, many, many years ago when I was twenty-three
I was married to a widow who was purty as can be
This widow had a grown-up daughter who had hair of red
My father fell in love with her and soon the two were wed.

This made my dad my son-in-law and changed my very life
For my daughter was my mother ’cause she was my father’s wife
To complicate the matter though it really brought me joy
I soon became the father of a bouncing baby boy.

This little baby then became a brother-in-law to Dad
And so became my uncle though it made me very sad
For if he was my uncle then that also made him brother
Of the widow’s grown-up daughter who of course is my step-mother.

My father’s wife then had a son who kept them on the run
And he became my grandchild for he was my daughter’s son
My wife is now my mother’s mother and it makes me blue
Because although she is my wife she’s my grandmama too.

Now if my wife is my grandmother then I’m her grandchild
And every time I think of it it nearly drives me wild
For now I have become the strangest case you ever saw
As husband of my grandma I am my own grandpa

I’m my own grandpa
I’m my own grandpa
It sounds funny I know
But it really is so
Oh, I’m my own grandpa

Posted in Wang Xiansheng | Leave a Comment »

Newsflash!

Posted by MyLaowai on Wednesday, April 1, 2009

The Chinese Communist Party has today announced that it, and all the serfs it controls, will start acting like grown ups, effective immediately. They further stated that they will no longer “act like whiney little children whenever we don’t get our own way”, and “plan on telling the truth in future”. Wang Xiansheng, the spokesperson for the Propaganda Ministry, broke the news at a hastily-called midnight press conference in the main bunker at Zhongnanhai.

World leaders were quick to welcome the news.

 

This post loses all validity at 12:00PM, Celestial Kingdom Standard Time.

Posted in Newsflash, Wang Xiansheng | 2 Comments »

Christie’s To Auction Falling Cow!

Posted by MyLaowai on Monday, March 2, 2009

ChinaDaily, the propaganda mouthpiece of the Chinese Communist Party, had this to say recently:

China fights to stop sale of looted relics.

China Tuesday demanded the auction of two looted historic bronze sculptures in Paris be canceled, saying it broke international conventions.

The auction seriously violates the country’s cultural rights and interests, and hurts national sentiment, it said.

A Paris court on Monday ruled against stopping the sale of the sculptures, rejecting an appeal filed by the Association for the Protection of Chinese Art in Europe.

The heads were taken from Beijing’s Old Summer Palace when it was razed by invading French and British forces in 1860 during the Second Opium War.

“The State Administration of Cultural Heritage (SACH) has formally informed the auctioneer of our strong opposition to the auction, and clearly demanded its cancellation,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu told a news conference.

“The Western powers have plundered a great amount of Chinese cultural relics including many precious items robbed from the Old Summer Palace. All these should be returned to China,” Ma said.

Potent stuff and, I’m sure you’ll agree, well worth further consideration. So here at MyLaowai HQ, we went to work finding out what all this hullabaloo is all about…

The Qing Dynasty. The Qing Dynasty (or Manchu) ruled China from 1644 to 1912, but the really interesting thing is that they weren’t Chinese. The Qing were in fact Russians (specifically, descended from Jurchens, a Tungusic people who lived around the region now comprising the Russian province of Primorsky Krai). They didn’t like the Chinese, they didn’t trust the Chinese, and they most certainly didn’t see themselves as being even remotely related to the Chinese, who were after all nothing more than chattel in the eyes of the ruling Manchu. They famously forced all Han Chinese men to shave the front of their heads and comb the remaining hair into a queue, on pain of death. To the Manchu, this policy was a test of loyalty and an aid in telling friend from foe. For the Han Chinese, however, it was a “humiliating act of degradation” that went against their traditional Confucian values. The order was so deeply unpopular that it triggered strong resistance to Qing rule until at least the late 1640s. Hundreds of thousands were killed before all of China was brought into compliance. As a result of this ‘Queue Order’, to this day the Chinese hold a deep aversion to queues of any kind.

The Opium Wars. In 1793, the Emperor of China stated to the British Ambassador that China had no use for European manufactured products, and that as a consequence, Chinese merchants would only accept bar silver as payment for their goods. The British and French governments eventually sought alternative payment options, one of which was opium. The Chinese Government, which held a monopoly over the growing, production, refining, distribution, and export of this profitable drug, responded by banning foreigners from the Opium Trade altogether, and seizing or destroying stocks of opium held by foreign traders.. This led to a bit of a scrap (later referred to as the First Opium War) between the East India Company and the Chinese Government, which was resolved when the Chinese Government agreed to play fair and by international rules, and signed the Treaty of Nanjing. This is generally regarded as signalling the end of China’s isolation.

The Second Opium War came about as a result of international demands that China open it’s markets to foreign merchants, exempt foreign imports from illegal ‘internal transit duties’, stop acts of piracy, regulate the coolie trade, and give permission for foreign ambassadors to reside in Beijing. The Chinese Government completely rejected all such demands, and furthermore refused to honour the terms of the Treaty of Nanjing that it had signed. That was followed by an attempt to poison the entire European population of Hong Kong. However, local bakers, who had been charged with lacing bread with arsenic, bungled the attempt by putting an excess of the poison into the dough, in sufficient quantities to be detected. Criers were sent out with an alert, averting disaster. Enough was enough, and the international community responded by telling the Chinese to play fair and by the rules, or else face the consequences. All parties then signed the Tianjin Treaty, which essentially granted permission for foreigners to travel in China, and forced the Chinese Government to pay compensation to British merchants for the illegal destruction of their property. The Chinese, predictably, did not honour the terms of the Treaty they had just signed, and insisted the British meet for ‘peace talks’. When the British sent an envoy to these ‘peace talks’, he and his entire entourage were arrested and tortured, with some brutally murdered. The international community discussed the destruction of the Forbidden City in order to discourage the Chinese from using kidnapping as a bargaining tool, and to exact justice for the mistreatment of their hostages. The final decision was further motivated by the torture and murder of almost twenty Western prisoners, including two British envoys and a journalist for The Times. The Russian envoy Count Ignatiev and the French diplomat Baron Gros settled on the burning of the Summer Palaces instead, since it was “least objectionable” and would not jeopardize the treaty.

The ‘Looting’ Of The Old Summer Palace. There are a number of competing theories one must consider here. They are:
The “I was sold these goods by Chinese officials” Theory.
The “This stuff was stolen by Chinese citizens and later sold to foreigners” Theory.
The “All foreigners are to blame for everything, always” Theory.
Personally, I tend to subscribe to a combination of the first two of these Theories, based on the testimony of my Great Great [etc] Grandfather, Captain Angus MacLaowai of the Royal Engineers. He was actually there at the time and his will made note of the fact that the items from the Old Summer Palace he left to his family (and which I today possess), were legally purchased from Wang Xiansheng, a Chinese trader in Beijing. I’ll be damned if I give back something that was legally purchased, just because a Chinese trader stole them in the first place.

Putting It All Together. So, the original makers of the items in question were not Chinese to begin with, but Manchu. The war in question was fully justified and was in fact caused by the Chinese Government not keeping it’s word. And the items themselves were not stolen or looted, but were in fact legally purchased in good faith by innocent foreigners. Christie’s auction of the rat and rabbit bronzes did not break any international agreements and the pieces’ legal ownership has been “clearly confirmed.” It all seems pretty clear to me.

What China Didn’t Mention. There’s something curiously missing from the ‘fire and brimstone’ reporting from ChinaDaily, and that is the fact that the current legal owner of the bronze heads offered to give them to the Chinese Government, free of charge. That’s right folks: Pierre Berge (partner of designer Yves Saint Laurent) offered to return the pieces to China in return for a pledge to improve human rights. That’s it, just a little promise to start behaving responsibly and treat their own people a little bit better. The Chinese foreign ministry dismissed his offer as “just ridiculous.” The Chinese Government went on to say that it demanded the statues’ return, but the French government said it received no official request from Beijing, and the sale went ahead. Berge is offering the proceeds to fight AIDS, while the Beijing-based Global Times is accusing France of “hurting China’s feelings”, as usual.

A Late Twist. A Chinese man said Monday he was the mystery collector behind winning bids for two imperial bronzes auctioned at Christie’s over Beijing’s objections, and that he made bogus offers to protest any sale of the looted relics.

Auction house owner Cai Mingchao said he made the $36 million in bids for the bronze rat and rabbit heads by telephone last week when the pieces were auctioned in Paris as part of a collection owned by the late French designer Yves Saint Laurent.

“What I need to stress is that this money cannot be paid,” Cai told a news conference in Beijing. “At the time, I was thinking that any Chinese would do this if they could…”.

Cai, an art collector and expert on relics, is the owner of Xinheart, an auction company in the southern Chinese city of Xiamen.

And Now, Another Auction. As the current legal owner of a number of items that originated from the Old Summer Palace at the time the Chinese were taught their lesson, I am well within my rights to dispose of the goods in any manner I see fit. I am offering one of these priceless family heirlooms to the New Beijing Museum, free of charge, in exchange for a pledge by the Chinese Government to improve human rights. The piece in question is a bronze that the MyLaowai Family refer to as the Falling Cow.

The ball’s in your court now, chaps.

Falling Cow Auction. Bidding Starts Soon.

Posted in China, Falling Cow Zone, Human Rights, Lies & Damned Lies, Wang Xiansheng | 9 Comments »

A Frank Exchange

Posted by MyLaowai on Saturday, October 11, 2008

To: SuperGoldenLucky Manufacturing Co.Ltd.
Date: 15 June 2008
Subject: Product Information

Dear Sir / Madam,

I have seen your products listed on your website. Could you please give me specific details regarding sizes, colours, materials, specifications, and FOB prices?

Regards,

MyLaowai.

*****

To: MyLaowai Company
Date: 18 June 2008
Subject: Re: Product Information

Hi Dear,

I want know,Your company is in American? Is a professionalcompany? Foreign trade corporation or not?

Your company iformaton is important to us.So for export the price maybe is not the same.

Welcome to SuperGoldenLucky Manufacturing!

Happy happy everyday!

Thanks and Kindly regards,

Wang XianSheng

*****

To: SuperGoldenLucky Manufacturing Co.Ltd.
Date: 18 June 2008
Subject: Product Information

Dear Wang XianSheng,

Thank you for your email. My company is based in the US and wants to be your customer.

I have seen your products listed on your website. Could you please give me specific details regarding sizes, colours, materials, specifications, and FOB prices?

Regards,

MyLaowai.

*****

To: MyLaowai Company
Date: 20 June 2008
Subject: Re: Product Information
Attachments: unreadabledoc.xls (42.3MB)

Hi Dear,

Our products attached . Warmly welcome to you!

Wang XianSheng

*****

To: SuperGoldenLucky Manufacturing Co.Ltd.
Date: 20 June 2008
Subject: Product Information

Dear Wang XianSheng,

Thank you for your email. I was finally able to download and translate it, but it does not answer the questions regarding available sizes, nor does it have any FOB prices.

Please give me the sizes and FOB prices.

Regards,

MyLaowai.

*****

To: MyLaowai Company
Date: 22 June 2008
Subject: Re: Product Information
Attachments: unreadabledoc.xls (42.3MB)

Hi Laowai,

We can do any size.You don’t need to worry about it. Price is best. Other company not have our attention to smaller detail and quality. To be honest I hope you could think about us at our site. We have to make the perfect products(this is the best important) for our mutual benefit.

Wang XianSheng

*****

To: SuperGoldenLucky Manufacturing Co.Ltd.
Date: 22 June 2008
Subject: Product Information

Dear Wang XianSheng,

1. What sizes can you make? What specific, actual, definite sizes can you make? Don’t give me a vague promise, give me a list of the sizes that you have molds for and can produce now.

2. What are your FOB prices?

Regards,

MyLaowai.

*****

To: MyLaowai Company
Date: 30 June 2008
Subject: Re: Product Information
Attachments: ouofdateprices.xls (1.2MB); anothercompanyssizes.doc (2.1MB)

Hi Laowai,

Attached prices and sizes.Wish you warmly welcome and when you can place order now?

Wang XianSheng

*****

To: MyLaowai Company
Date: 02 July 2008
Subject:

Hi my dear friend,

This is Wang XianSheng- now I working another company .It is a much better products and you know, the other company is not honest have many bad products.My company now is very best and have good price for you because you ar such dear and old friend.

Warmly welcome to you.

Wang XianSheng

*****

To: SuperGoldenLucky Manufacturing Co.Ltd.
Date: 05 July 2008
Subject: Sample Order
Attachments: SampleOrder.doc

Dear Sir / Madam,

I would like to place a small, sample order with your company, for the products in the attachment.

Please confirm the order, and advise a delivery date, as well as your account details for payment.

Regards,

MyLaowai.

*****

To: SuperGoldenLucky Manufacturing Co.Ltd.
Date: 10 July 2008
Subject: Sample Order
Attachments: SampleOrder.doc

Dear Sir / Madam,

I recently sent you an email, placing a sample order with your company, for the products in the attachment.

Please confirm the order, and advise a delivery date, as well as your account details for payment.

Regards,

MyLaowai.

*****

To: MyLaowai Company
Date: 11 July 2008
Subject: Re: Sample Order

Hi Dear,

I want know,Your company is in American? Is a professionalcompany? Foreign trade corporation or not?

Your company iformaton is important to us.So for export the price maybe is not the same.

Welcome to SuperGoldenLucky Manufacturing!

Happy happy everyday!

Thanks and Kindly regards,

Chou PangZhu

*****

Happy happy. Every day.

Posted in Wang Xiansheng | 7 Comments »

Wang 2.0: The Return of Wang?

Posted by MyLaowai on Sunday, June 29, 2008

Part 3 of a 3 part story.
*** Part 1 *** Part 2 ***

In 1949 the first Wang XianSheng rolled off the production lines at Beijing’s No.3 Light Industrial Plant. It proved a huge success, with tens of millions being built for Communist China over the next 60 years.

Wang 2.0, released last week, is the new high performance workerbot from CCP Systems. In this review, we are going to look at the various components and compare it with existing models to see if we can answer the question: is this workerbot really the best on the market today?

Wang 2.0 on our test bench – is this the shape of things to come?

First Look – Thin Skin?
As you can see, Wang 2.0 bears a superficial resemblance to the workerbots it is intended to replace. In fact, all the Wang, Gao, Zhang, Li, Liu and Chen workerbots are the product of Harmonious Assimilation Networks (HAN) design studios, and Wang 2.0 is no exception. The difference lies not only under the skin, but includes the skin itself – the skin of the Wang 2.0 is considerably thinner than on any previous model. Some experts consider that this will leave the bot vulnerable to the many skin diseases prevalent in the environments in which it will operate, and indeed this is a valid point, but to understand the real benefits of this thin skin, one must look to the reaction co-processor, a new microcircuit known as the Organism Fabricated for Fighting, Efficient Nullification and Socialist Exploration module (OFFENSE). The new Wang 2.0 is actually capable of claiming offence on behalf of “All The Chinese People”, in a staggering 5,000 different ways! CCP Systems claim that Wang 2.0 is the most easily offended workerbot ever produced, and if the numbers are true, we certainly are impressed.

CPU and Head Systems

The above images show the ‘brain’ of the bot, the CPU, massively increased in size from previous models, and the new Positronic Robotic Organiser Programmed for Accurate Gratification, Adept Nullification and Dangerous Attitudes (PROPAGANDA) chip. You can see the many tendrils that snake throughout the control systems of Wang 2.0 – this is the first time such a complex command node processor has been used in a workerbot.

New hyper-threading technology, invented 5,000 years ago in Xi’an (and recently stolen by Intel), means that Wang 2.0 is the first Chinese workerbot with a true multi-tasking capability, able to eat, excrete, whine, and sleep simultaneously. CCP Systems claim that Wang 2.0 can also walk whilst chewing gum, but our tests showed otherwise. It appears that there is still some way to go before foreign models can be effectively replaced in many roles.

Dual Channel DDR-2 memory by GOLDFISH.

Bionics
A changing, fast-paced world has meant that older, low (and in many cases, no-) productivity models are no longer capable of meeting China’s needs for a modern workforce. Wang 2.0 is designed to be a powerhouse of a production worker. CCP Systems claim Wang 2.0 is the best workerbot in the world – let’s see how it measured up in our benchmarking tests:


Although Wang 2.0 is clearly far superior to the earlier Wang XianSheng series, it still poses no real threat to the current market leaders, although it could easily find its way into the low-cost African market.


The main bionics chassis is built by Lifeform Assemblies for Zealous Yelling (LAZY), and are a direct spin-off from China’s space program astrobot (Synthetic Technician Optimized for Logical Exploration and Nullification, or STOLEN). CCP Systems have not released efficiency rating figures yet, but our tests show that Wang 2.0 is less efficient than its predecessor, Wang XianSheng. Whereas the XianSheng-series could operate on just 7mg of rice and a chicken claw a day, Wang 2.0 requires no less than an entire bowl of congee just to kickstart its primary systems every day. That said, once it gets started, Wang 2.0 is no slouch – speeds of up to 3km/h were recorded during our benchmarking tests. Straight-line distances of nearly a meter were also recorded.

Other Applications
Wang 2.0 is clearly intended to form the basis of a new range of workerbots, with potential military, social, governmental, and espionage applications, and a recently released photograph shows Wang 2.0 adapted for use as a high-altitude construction worker:

Conclusion
Wang 2.0 is truly a very high-end bot that will bring an impressive performance boost if you are a serious manufacturer in the Chinese marketplace.

In factory environments with work quality settings configured at “high”, Wang 2.0 was between 62% and 70% faster than Wang XianSheng and between 62% and 68% faster than Gao XianSheng. In the same factory with work quality settings configured at “low”, Wang 2.0 was between 67% and 126% faster than Wang XianSheng – here however Liu2000 and Harmonious Li achieved the same performance level, with the only significant difference seen at lunchtime, where this workerbot from CCP Systems was 34% faster than any other model.

We are now even more curious to see the performance of Wang 2.0 ‘AYI’, as it will reach the market costing “only” USD$400. We hope to get one very soon. Stay tuned!

Posted in Wang Xiansheng | 5 Comments »